Marko Djordjevic & Sveti  /  New York Seriously Listenable Eclectic Jazz
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Marko Djordjevic & Sveti

Seriously Listenable Eclectic Jazz
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All About Jazz Review — 08/13/2014

By JOHN EPHLAND, Published: June 1, 2014 | 2,461 views Marko Djordjevic & Sveti: Something Beautiful +++++++++++++++++ Drop the "needle" down anywhere on Something Beautiful and you're likely to find ... something beautiful. There's some hidden spirit that carries this music along from track to track as drummer/composer Marko Djordjevic takes his merry band of four (when it's not a trio) through 12 hearty originals, all of them Djordjevic's. After listening to two new ones from Jimmy Cobb and Louis Hayes, "Heart Bop" hearkens back to those rough-and-ready days, in a sense setting the stage for what is to follow on Something Beautiful. We hear the Serbian-born Djordjevic with the well- known group Sveti, in full up-tempo swing mode, his fills not superfluous but a kind of egging on for pianist Bobby Avey en route to Eli Degibri's robust tenor sax solo. It's busy, it's rambunctious, it's fun, and the drummer is all over the place, his technique in the service of something akin to the title of the song. But there's more than just an echo of the days when Cobb and Hayes were more front and center. Otherwise, yours truly would probably not be here, writing this review. "Which Way Is Down" is a subtle, busy conversation between the trio, which also includes bassist Desmond White. It's busy in the sense that it's active, but it's also more dreamlike, Avey's skill as a pianist clearly on display as he watches Djordjevic's every move, interacting with White as a kind of alter ego, but also when the pace drops "down" and Avey can just meander a bit, drummer and bassist in tow, White's quiet, restful turn soon to follow. This is the gel that keeps the music flowing throughout Something Beautiful, Djordjevic's pen and the players' execution suggesting a band that has learned patience as a threesome, the drummer's restrained shuffles the perfect complement. The middle section of Something Beautiful is less dramatic, more a kind of display of styles, "Home Made" and "Ten Large Serbians" showcasing the band's flair without any riveting, stop-what-your-doing moments. More examples of how everyone works together in idioms. The alternate tenorist on board is Tivon Pennicott, surfacing on the rhythmically "Poinciana"-flavored title track. There's a more rootsy dimension to this song, though, the melody nothing like the Ahmad Jamal tune, more a folk visitation, Pennicott's playing straight out of the jazz lineage but couched in this other-world European style all the while exuding a kind of sweaty joy only found in a club somewhere on a summer night in New York City. Avey's piano playing here, by the way, is exquisite, dreamlike, Djordjevic's playing sensitive with an edge. Djordjevic's playing at times reminds one of Tony Williams, his adept skills with sticks on all skins and steel both a kind of surging but also always capable of restraint. You get the impression this guy has the chops, mostly held in reserve. And this despite the fact that it's his record. And, like Williams (and unlike Cobb and Hayes), he seems keen to write his own music and not settle for others' material when making his own statements. "Flaxy World" sets the stage for the last section, Djordjevic's rolling snare figures combined with Avey's punctuations and White's deep listening telling this listener that it's the trio that, once again, makes Something Beautiful cook. Restless, it's not the blues but it has the elements. And "War Song," while it includes Pennicott's strong tenor, still sits as a trio piece that is the least jazz-like song here, but so what? It plays like another meditation of something horrible wrapped inside something beautiful. The rockin,' flamboyant "Celebration" breaks the mood into something akin to a wedding reception with dervish dancing all around, and the gently swinging trio piece "Svetlana Swinging On A Summer Evening" may have one re-enjoying the lovely refrain from the third track, "Svetlana," the song's folk cadence and sweetly sung melody enough to keep one guessing as to what comes next from this unpredictable composer who also happens to be a damn good drummer.

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Marko Djordjevic & Sveti at The Blue Note - HEART BOP...

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti at The Blue Note - HEART BOP

Tivon Pennicott - sax, Bobby Avey - piano, Peter Slavov - bass, Marko Djordjevic - drums and composition. CD release concert for Something Beautiful 1709-2110

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti -  ONE SHORT OF NORMAL...

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - ONE SHORT OF NORMAL

Bobby Avey - Piano Desmond White - bass Marko Djordjevic - drums and composition

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL...

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL

Sveti Live at the Blue Note. Solos by Aaron Goldberg and Brad Mason. Nir Felder - guitar, Elliot Mason -trombone, Matt Pavolka - bass.

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - HOME MADE...

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - HOME MADE

CD release concert featuring Bobby Avey - piano, Tivon Pennicott - sax, Peter Slavov - bass.

Album Cover - Something Beautiful 1709-2110, Goalkeeper Records 2013 | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Album Cover - Something Beautiful 1709-2110, Goalkeeper Records 2013
Blue Note CD release concert for Something Beautiful 1709-2110 | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Blue Note CD release concert for Something Beautiful 1709-2110
Going In All The Way! | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Going In All The Way!
Full House at Pierre Mercure hall in Montreal | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Full House at Pierre Mercure hall in Montreal
Sveti at The Blue Note | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Sveti at The Blue Note
In The Zone | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
In The Zone
My chapter in The New Face Of Jazz (1) | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
My chapter in The New Face Of Jazz (1)
My chapter in The New Face Of Jazz (2) | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
My chapter in The New Face Of Jazz (2)
Sveti's Architect :-) | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Sveti's Architect :-)
In Good Company | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
In Good Company
Sapporo, Japan | Marko Djordjevic & Sveti
Sapporo, Japan
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Marko Djordjevic & Sveti  /  New York Seriously Listenable Eclectic Jazz

For over ten years, SVETI has been the creative outlet for one of the most impressive and innovative drummers in the world today, the Serbian-born New York resident Marko Djordjevic (pronounced Georgevich).

One of the finest musicians of our era, Blue Note recording artist Lionel Loueke says: "Marko is one of the greatest drummers out there. He possesses incredible technique, and a musical mind to match it! I love playing with him because he is so creative and unique!"

In a chapter dedicated to him in the recently published book, The New Face Of Jazz (author Cicily Janus, Billboard press/Random House, Inc.), it is said that "Marko's name is quickly becoming synonymous with greatness and diversity."

As the composer for SVETI, Djordjevic writes music inspired equally by his Balkan roots and the sounds of the American artists that have influenced him, from John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk to Ahmad Jamal and Tony Williams.

Called a “world-class drummer” and “a true innovator” by Modern Drummer magazine, Marko Djordjevic has played on about 50 albums and has thousands of live performances worldwide to his credit. Goakeeper Records recently released Something Beautiful, Marko's fourth album as leader. The release garnered praise from both peers and press:


"Marko is a superb drummer and composer. His new album is grooving and captivating throughout." - Ari Hoenig

"Djordjevic is young and plainly set to join the true greats. As with gents like Jon Christensen, Jack DeJohnette and Billy Cobham, an uninterrupted loop flows from mind and heart into hands then through the drums and back again." - Mark C. Tucker, Accoustic Exchange

"For creativity and approach this release gets five stars. Everything else is simply gravy on what is a true sleeper and stellar performance for 2013." - Criticaljazz.com

"Masterful drummer with Serbian roots." - Cadence Magazine

Growing up in Serbia, where melodies in mixed odd meters can be heard even in the chants of soccer fans, the rich musical tradition became a platform for Djordjevic to build upon. His natural connection with jazz can be traced to the uncanny sonic likeness shared by traditional brass bands from New Orleans and Serbian brass bands he could hear walking down the streets of Belgrade. A swinging groove and the freedom of improvisation - common threads in the music played by these geographically distant "musical cousins" - are what SVETI is about!

Matt Garrison, Wayne Krantz, Jonah Smith, Clarence Spady, Lucky Peterson, Jacques Schwartz-Bart, Garry Willis, Hal Crook, Eli Degibri, Lionel Loueke, Aaron Goldberg, Damian Erskine,The Itals, The Kung Fu Masters, Chris McDermott, Ole Mathiesen, Sten Hostfalt, The Mason Brothers, Tim Miller, and Eric Lewis are some of the artists Djordjevic has performed and/or recorded with since he graduated from Berklee College of Music where he was accepted on a scholarship at the tender age of 16.

Marko is an A-level endorser of DDRUM, Zildjian, Evans, and Vic Firth and has been featured as a soloist and clinician at many of the world's top music events such as PASIC, Music Messe, Montreal Drum Fest, NAMM, Music Fest Canada, Jazz Yatra India. He has also appeared at some of the most prominent contemporary music schools (Berklee College of Music, Drummers Collective, MIT, Modern Music in Greece, L'aula in Spain, etc).

Alfred Publishing is the exclusive worldwide distributor of his critically-acclaimed DVD entitled Where I Come From - A Fresh Approach To Drumming and book The New Frontier.

In addition to his busy performing schedule, Marko is a faculty member at The Drummers Collective in NYC. He also teaches privately at his NYC studio.

Marko Djordjevic

drums and compositions

Julian Pollack

piano

Peter Slavov

bass

Tivon Pennicott

tenor sax
Aug 13, 2014

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All About Jazz Review

By JOHN EPHLAND, Published: June 1, 2014 | 2,461 views Marko Djordjevic & Sveti: Something Beautiful +++++++++++++++++ Drop the "needle" down anywhere on Something Beautiful and you're likely to find ... something beautiful. There's some hidden spirit that carries this music along from track to track as drummer/composer Marko Djordjevic takes his merry band of four (when it's not a trio) through 12 hearty originals, all of them Djordjevic's. After listening to two new ones from Jimmy Cobb and Louis Hayes, "Heart Bop" hearkens back to those rough-and-ready days, in a sense setting the stage for what is to follow on Something Beautiful. We hear the Serbian-born Djordjevic with the well- known group Sveti, in full up-tempo swing mode, his fills not superfluous but a kind of egging on for pianist Bobby Avey en route to Eli Degibri's robust tenor sax solo. It's busy, it's rambunctious, it's fun, and the drummer is all over the place, his technique in the service of something akin to the title of the song. But there's more than just an echo of the days when Cobb and Hayes were more front and center. Otherwise, yours truly would probably not be here, writing this review. "Which Way Is Down" is a subtle, busy conversation between the trio, which also includes bassist Desmond White. It's busy in the sense that it's active, but it's also more dreamlike, Avey's skill as a pianist clearly on display as he watches Djordjevic's every move, interacting with White as a kind of alter ego, but also when the pace drops "down" and Avey can just meander a bit, drummer and bassist in tow, White's quiet, restful turn soon to follow. This is the gel that keeps the music flowing throughout Something Beautiful, Djordjevic's pen and the players' execution suggesting a band that has learned patience as a threesome, the drummer's restrained shuffles the perfect complement. The middle section of Something Beautiful is less dramatic, more a kind of display of styles, "Home Made" and "Ten Large Serbians" showcasing the band's flair without any riveting, stop-what-your-doing moments. More examples of how everyone works together in idioms. The alternate tenorist on board is Tivon Pennicott, surfacing on the rhythmically "Poinciana"-flavored title track. There's a more rootsy dimension to this song, though, the melody nothing like the Ahmad Jamal tune, more a folk visitation, Pennicott's playing straight out of the jazz lineage but couched in this other-world European style all the while exuding a kind of sweaty joy only found in a club somewhere on a summer night in New York City. Avey's piano playing here, by the way, is exquisite, dreamlike, Djordjevic's playing sensitive with an edge. Djordjevic's playing at times reminds one of Tony Williams, his adept skills with sticks on all skins and steel both a kind of surging but also always capable of restraint. You get the impression this guy has the chops, mostly held in reserve. And this despite the fact that it's his record. And, like Williams (and unlike Cobb and Hayes), he seems keen to write his own music and not settle for others' material when making his own statements. "Flaxy World" sets the stage for the last section, Djordjevic's rolling snare figures combined with Avey's punctuations and White's deep listening telling this listener that it's the trio that, once again, makes Something Beautiful cook. Restless, it's not the blues but it has the elements. And "War Song," while it includes Pennicott's strong tenor, still sits as a trio piece that is the least jazz-like song here, but so what? It plays like another meditation of something horrible wrapped inside something beautiful. The rockin,' flamboyant "Celebration" breaks the mood into something akin to a wedding reception with dervish dancing all around, and the gently swinging trio piece "Svetlana Swinging On A Summer Evening" may have one re-enjoying the lovely refrain from the third track, "Svetlana," the song's folk cadence and sweetly sung melody enough to keep one guessing as to what comes next from this unpredictable composer who also happens to be a damn good drummer.

Source

Aug 06, 2014

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Dmitry Epstein Review

Not beating ’round the bebop bush, Serbian skin-kicker finds a beating heart of the matter. Be it the Balkans or the Mississippi delta, the groove always keeps questing souls on the move: this New York resident knows, or rather feels, it only too well, having been at both spots. No rest for the wicked, one may say, yet wherever he stays wonders are abound as the title of Djordjevic’s solo project implies, and the pride of place Marko occupied on “Drummer’s Dance” from his compatriot Dusan Jevtovic’s "Am I Walking Wrong?" gave but a mere hint of what he’s capable of. Here, on a dozen of self-composed pieces, he proves that the era of kit-operating bandleaders hasn’t passed and jazz experimentation in a traditional set is very much alive. It takes deliberately wobbly sync and sensual syncopation on “Svetlana” and its skittering reprise “Svetlana Swinging On A Summer Evening” to create an intimate essay in a rhythm section elegance, yet there’s a different sort of excitement in such effervescent charmers as “Flaxy World” or “2007” where rimshots and cymbals caress are palpable part of the fabric. Unlike the similar shift of “Chimes” which unfurls in slow motion, the jubilant, in turns merry and anthemic, chords and splashes, that carry “Heart Bop” and the bossa-colored “Ten Large Serbians” see the leader steal the thunder – highly charged, no electric lick in sight – from Bobby Avey’s graceful piano and pass it to Eli Degibri and Tivon Pennicott’s saxes, all the while jiving around Desmond White’s bass. Such a deep end comes balanced by the East European reserve of the romantic title track and the “Home Made” cha-cha-cha, although the folk edge of “War Song” understandably banishes the patinated humor in favor of well-tempered disharmony which echoes the tension shaped once “Which Way Is Down” ends so abruptly. Still, “Celebraion” brings the jazz beauty back home, wherever it may be: it’s that thrillingly comfortable. Coming from a new star, this album could be a monumental work if it weren’t so nuanced.

Source

Apr 09, 2014

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Notable Peer Quotes - Ari Hoenig

"Marko is a superb a drummer and composer. His new record draws from many different sources, yet it is consistently captivating and grooving throughout!" Ari Hoenig (Punk Bop, Chris Potter)

Mar 03, 2014

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Criticalljazz.com Review

My wheelhouse for more traditional jazz seems to be having a tremendous amount of European influence. The influx of European players and their cultural D.N.A when it comes to the improvised music we refer to as jazz in the United States is innovative and takes the music to both a visceral and cerebral level sometimes missing from American artists that at times can seem a bit complacent with their craft. Marko Djordjevic is a world class drummer, a prolific composer and perhaps the finest drummer that seems to be lingering just below the surface of more wide spread acceptance. It is a long way from Serbia to New Orleans but the commonality is the rolling groove and relentless passion that Djordjevic & Sveti bring to the table. While an A list band turns in a phenomenal outing, the two tenor players being Eli Degibri and Tivon Pennicott are eerily reminiscent of the old school blowing sessions that some Blue Note and Impulse recordings were famous for back in the sixties. Odd meters and mixed with a myriad of cultural influences are indeed the future for more traditional jazz with Djordjevic leading the way. "Heart Bop" is a high octane burner that sidesteps the traditional form and function of western influence to push the virtuosic improvisations to a new level while never losing the overwhelming lyrical sense of purpose. "Which Way Is Down" is a 180 degree turn around that has a bright and breezy piano that manages to maintain the percussive driving force while creating a new and underlying dynamic tension which the band seems to feed off of. The beautiful ballad "Svetlana" dials the trio back allowing the subtle nuances of Djordjevic to come front and center. The group dynamic here is free and unforgiving with each voice allowed to make their own musical statement. For creativity and approach this release would get five stars. Everything else is simply gravy on what is a true sleeper and stellar performance for 2013.

Feb 12, 2014

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Doctor Jazz Review

Marko Djordjevic and Sveti – SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL: Marko is one heckuvva’ drummer, I’ll tell you THAT! As you scope out the opener, “Heart Bop“, your ears won’t believe the (almost) nuclear energy he’s pushing out through those drums & it doesn’t hurt that he’s got giant players like Bobby Avey on piano, Desmond White on bass, and Eli Degibri/Tivon Pennicott on tenor sax. An even dozen free-spirited tracks that will bring your ears (& your head) back out of whatever slump you might have been in… I was especially impressed by tunes like the whirling dervish “Ten Large Serbians” – in fact, that’s my personal favorite on the CD. Some excellent jazz – I can guarantee that you’ll be hearing much more from this highly talented player in the months & years to come. I give Marko & crew a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, with an “EQ” (energy quotient) rating of (top-o’-the-line) 5.00 – which means he also gets the “PICK” of this issue for “most innovative jazz”. Get more information at Marko’s website. Rotcod Zzaj

Source

Feb 05, 2014

shoutout

Notable Peer Quotes - Michael Henderson

"Marko is a Fantastic Drummer and his master delivery makes him a great pleasure to work with!" - Michael Henderson (Stevie Wonder, Miles Davis)

Nov 29, 2013

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Acoustic Music Exchange Review

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti Available from CD Baby. A review written for the Folk & Acoustic Music Exchange by Mark S. Tucker () Right from the start of Something Beautiful: 1709 - 2110, Marko Djordjevic reminded me of a drummer one rarely ever hears about, even though he was at one time a powerful up-and-comer and is still around, playing as muscularly as ever: Ronald Shannon Jackson. The reason for the kindredness twixt Jackson and Djordjevic is readily apparent: both are absolutely fearless, take control from the moment the music starts, and have zero back-off. Good percussionists are fairly common, powerful drummers less so, but cats who can bend the kit to their will without even thinking about it demonstrate a rare personality in music, one usually only seen in the best death/speed/tech metal skinspounders. Not a moment goes by that Djordjevic's array isn't as much front instrument as the saxists or pianist. In fact, the real lead voice in the disc is indeed that ferocious and often quite intricate tack the percussionist takes, himself as much a resonant element of the kit as the drum pieces themselves. This is unusual. Most drummers merely sit at the controls, but magazines and books have already picked up on Marko as a force of nature at one and enmeshed within his instrument. The promo lit poses the CD's ensemble work as "attentive, unselfish, and multidirectional interplay", and I have little quibble with except for this: you could no more hold back Djurdjevic than you could Ritchie Blackmore, Anthony Braxton, Jimi Hendrix, Larry Coryell, Keith Emerson, Keith Moon, or any musician imbued with an indomitable spirit and artistry which can find no other expression than exactly as it's laid out. So, sure, itis multidirectional but in a way that rests first in the drums and the flow of unending creativity bursting from them. Djordjevic is young and plainly set to join the true greats. As with gents like Jon Christensen, Jack DeJohnette, Billy Cobham, and others, an uninterrupted loop flows from mind and heart into hands then through the drums and back again. There's no separation of facilities or faculties, it's all one. And…ohh wait…there's a band, Sveti, too? Just kidding…but not by much. They're good, especially pianist Bobby Avey, but I'm telling you now that Marko Djurdjevic has yet to find his true home. When he does, look out! I can't even guess what that'll mean except to hark back to Mahavishnu Orchestra, Univers Zero, King Crimson, and so on, because when it comes to the traps, this guy defines 'progression'.

Source

Nov 13, 2013

shoutout

Notable Peer Quotes - Nir Felder

"Marko Djordevic's new album "Something Beautiful" is just that - great compositions, beautifully interpreted and performed, excellently produced and recorded. A fantastic record by an exciting artist. - Nir Felder (Terry Lyne Carrington, Eric Harland)

Nov 12, 2013

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Cadence Magazine Review

S omething Beautiful is another quintet outing yet it is significantly different from the Chris Massey package. First off, it's a two tenor sax plus conventional rhythm section group assembled by Marko Djordjeciv a master - ful drummer with Serbian roots. He was something of a prodigy in his youth and enrolled in Berkeley at a very young age. Secondly, the Sveti unit has recorded under his leadership previously and has ranged up to septet size with fluctuating personnel. The kicker on this issue is half of the dozen tracks are trio while the tenorists split the other six. Thought I heard a snippet of both playing together the cut that has the bowed bass introduction and didn't hear any piano on another that sports tenor Tivon's horn over upright and drums. At times the piano trio selections, especially “Which Way Is Down”, were re mindful of the Keith Jarrett Standards Trio. There's also a tuneful bass spot on the leisurely swinging final number while the opening selection with Eli Degibri's searing saxophone is by far the jazziest. Another interesting one from Marko. Larry Hollis

Sep 17, 2013

shoutout

Notable Peer Quotes - Lee Townshend

"Marko's music on his new album is strong and lovely as always!" Lee Townshend - producer (Bill Frisell, John Scofield)

Aug 31, 2013

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One of this Summer's Best Discs! San Diego Mercury News

CD Review: Summer's best jazz discs, recommended by Richard Scheinin Marko Djordjevic and Sveti: "Something Beautiful" (Goalkeeper). The Serbian-born drummer builds the post-bop/modal energy from track to track. Appealing tunes, and the ace band includes heavyweight tenors Eli Degibri and Tivon Pennicott, as well as pianist Bobby Avey.

Source

Aug 28, 2013

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Seattle P.I. Review by Jack Goodstein

When they talk about vital new voices in jazz, there are a bunch of them on this album. Not only the drum sensation who is leading the ensemble and composing all the music, but 2011 Thelonious Monk Competition winner, pianistBobby Avery, and Australian bassist Desmond White make up the trio that handles six of the 12 tunes on the album. The other six tracks add tenor sax. Three feature Israeli tenor sax man Eli Degibri, and three Tivon Pennicott. Given Djordjevic's Serbian heritage, this is a group of musical artists with an international flair. Good jazz comes from anywhere and everywhere. Some of his music may reflect the drummer's musical inheritance, but all of it swings with the kinds of rhythmic creativity and harmonic changes we've come to expect from the best in contemporary jazz. The uptempo "Ten Large Serbians" serves as a jazzy shout out to the drummer's homeland, and "Home Made" has a little fun with what a cheesy local combo might do with a Latin sound, at least until Pennicott takes over for a sweet little solo. The ballad "Svetlana" and its reincarnation as "Svetlana Swinging on a Summer Evening" which ends the album both demonstrate the transformation possible to ethnic influences. On the other hand, Pennicott's work on a track like "War Song" has a spacey, almost mystical quality with a truly modern vibe. Djordjevic points out that the opening tune on the album pays homage to Ahmad Jamal and Tony Williams, so there are roots here also; they are jazz roots. He even suggests a nod to classical influences in "2007" and "Chimes." Review by Jack Goodstein

Source

Aug 15, 2013

shoutout

Notable Peer Quotes - Clarence Spady

"Marko is truly a melodic drummer, no matter what style of music he is playing... Just listen to his new album, that will explain it more than I can express..."
Clarence Spady (Inducted into the National Blues Hall Of Fame in 2012)

Aug 12, 2013

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Gapple Gate Music Review

When a band gets a froth going, gets a kind of late-bop, post-Trane kick to it like later Lee Morgan and some of the Trane-influenced outfits of that late-'60s early-'70s and beyond, I perk up and pay attention. That happened to me from hearing the opening "grooves" on with Serbian-born drummer Marko Djordjevic and his group Sveti on Something Beautiful 1709-2110 (Goalkeeper). It's a hard-hitting set of very solid Djorjevic numbers played by a trio of the drummer and Bobby Avey on piano, Desmond White on acoustic bass. For half the set the band is ably augmented by the tenor of either Eli Degibri or Tivon Pennicott. Djordjevic is an excellent drummer with great forward momentum, strong swing and his own sort of busy flourishes. With Avey pushing some hard comping in a post-Tyner vein and White laying down a rock solid bass foundation, things set up nicely for a three way cooking that allows Djordjevic to show his original heat in a very good light. But it is strong modern mainstream hard jazz in the whole sense, not "just" a drummer's showcase. Avey plays strongly and the two tenors when present account well for themselves. The final element that brings it all together are the tunes. Marko pens some really effective vehicles and that makes it all stand out and hang together start-to-finish. It's not all burners. There are some balladic changes of pace too. And there are traditional Serbian influences there also on melody lines and time signatures now and again. This is a well-paced scorcher of an album. Don't miss this one.

Source

Aug 08, 2013

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Jazz Weekly Review

Drummer Marko Djordjevic leads a trio/quartet through some exhilaratingly complex and active originals with his trio team of Bobby Avey/p and Desmond White/b alongside a quartet that exchanges tenor players Eli Degibri and Tivon Pennicott. His active and garrulous drumming works well with Avey’s energetic and fervent hands on the clean themed “Ten Large Serbians” as well as the active “2007” and dramatic “Which Way Is Down, “ while the interplay with White on “Svetlana” is subtle and effective. The octanes get a bit higher with the tenor, as Coltrane-esqe overflows of emotion burst like a geyser on ”Heart Bop” and “War Song” which fluctuates between emotional anthems and cathartic expulsions. Some enchanting Eastern European themes pop in throughout the session, most successfully on the festive “Home Made” and the galloping title piece Assertive music that works best when the reins are held in just a tad for the group of stallions.

Source

Jul 09, 2013

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Review From Italy

Dalla Serbia agli Stati Uniti, una salto al buio oltre l´Oceano per il batterista serbo Marko Djordjevic che si è alla fine rivelato giusto. È un grande batterista, come ha dimostrato nei suoi dischi e su questo ultimo in particolare, con dei sidemen americani di grande livello, su tutti il sassofonista tenore Eli Degibri, spesso con i grandi nomi del jazz contemporaneo, impegnato in tre brani. In altri tre brani c´è un altro giovane sassofonista tenore, Tivon Pennicott anche lui molto bravo e con uno stile più “ruvido” dell´affermato collega di origine israeliana. L´altra metà dei brani è eseguita in trio insieme a Bobby Avey al pianoforte eDesmond White al contrabbasso. La musica di origine modale, come ormai si usa, è eseguita da musicisti molto bravi tecnicamente, continuamente propulsi da un batterista dalla capacità tecniche infinite. È lui che alle spalle agita le acque mantenendo la base ritmica in continua agitazione ed allo stesso tempo la musica molto vitale. Anche quando sembra che la musica vada verso momenti più lirici e tranquilli in trio, ad esempio sul finale Svetlana Swinging on a Summer Evening o sul bel tema di Which Way Is Down eccolo lì a sfornare ritmi, a soprendere per tutto quello che riesce a comunicare senza assolutamente sovrastare la musica. In mezzo alla musica modale di marca americana spunta qualcosa di europeo, il trio di Svetlana, molto poetico, o il ritmo balcanico di Home Made. Nel complesso un gran bel disco, in cui belle esecuzioni ed un grande batterista vanno a braccetto. By Vittorio Lo Conte

Source

Jul 04, 2013

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Hot House Review

CD Review: Hot House July 2013 MARKO DJORDJEVIC In the tradition of Tony Williams, Marvin "Smitty" Smith and Jeff "Tain" Watts, Marko BAR NEXT DOOR / JULY 4 AND SUBCULTURE / JULY 11 Djordjevic is one of those agile, powerhouse drummers who never takes his foot off the gas pedal. Born in Serbia, the Berklee honors graduate has teamed with many contemporary jazz artists including Bill Frisell, Jacques Schwarz-Bart, Gypsy Boogie, Lionel Loueke, bluesmen Clarence Spady and Lucky Peterson, and The Itals. Across four recordings with his group Sveti, Djordjevic has established an original sound based on his heritage and influences such as John Coltrane, Joe Zawinul and Frank Zappa. It's rooted in serious, modal compositions that command your attention. His new CD Something Beautiful - 1709-2110 is out on the independent Goalkeeper label. At Sub- Culture, Sveti includes bassist Peter Slavov and saxophonist Tivon Pennicott.

Jul 03, 2013

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Jazz Quad Russia Review

Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - Something Beautiful 1709-2110 03.07.2013 Marko Djordjevic & Sveti - Something Beautiful 1709-2110 В 12 лет белградский мальчик Марко Джорджевич (р.1972) взял в руки барабанные палочки, чтобы никогда больше не расставаться с ними. Быстро прогрессируя в технике игры, в 16 лет он уже отправился во всемирно известный колледж Беркли в Бостоне, где продолжил учебу и даже заработал там в 1991 году стипендию знаменитой фирмы Zildjian. С 1993 года, с дипломом Беркли в кармане, Джорджевич с головой окунулся в музыкальный мир Нью-Йорка и за прошедшие годы стал хорошо известным и востребованным джазовым барабанщиком, участником целого ряда проектов, в том числе и лидером собственной группы Sveti , новый альбом которой мы сегодня и представляем. Something Beautiful 1709-2110 – полностью авторский альбом Марко, как композитора. Сразу скажу, что секрет интригующих цифр после слов «Нечто прекрасное» в названии альбома, мне так и не удалось разгадать. Даже всезнающая Сеть молчит, а сам автор предпочел свой месседж не расшифровывать. Зато, как мне кажется, названия очень лиричных и эмоциональных композиций альбома Svetlana и Svetlana Swinging On A Summer Evening имеют самое прямое отношение к Светлане Платиса Джорджевич, указанной на конверте альбома, как автор фотографии музыканта, да и весь проект в целом Марко посвятил своей семье. Из 12 вошедших в Something Beautiful 1709-2110 композиций ровно половину Джорджевич записал в формате трио с пианистом Бобби Эйви и басистом Дезмондом Уайтом, в остальных шести трио превращается в квартет, когда к вышеназванным исполнителям присоединяется тенор-саксофонист. Эту роль в трех пьесах исполняет Эли Диджибри, а в других трех – Тайвон Пенникотт. Из всех участников группы Sveti мне ранее доводилось слышать, причем живьем, Диджибри, когда израильско-американский саксофонист приезжал несколько лет назад в Минск в составе квартета Эла Фостера, кстати, тоже ударника, а также пианиста Эйви на свежем альбоме Дэйва Либмана Lineage, и их мастерство и уровень игры представлял. Но именно Джорджевич дал возможность и этим музыкантам, и Уайту с Пенникоттом раскрыться особенно ярко. Sveti – отлично сыгранный коллектив из музыкантов, находящихся в самом расцвете творческих сил. Конечно, огромная заслуга в сплочении этих исполнителей в единую команду принадлежит самому Марко, и роль, которую играют его барабаны в саунде группы, становится понятной чуть ли не с первых тактов стартовой пьесы Heart Bop. Стилистически Sveti играют современный пост-боп с очень заметным акцентом в сторону балканской этники. Джорджевич-композитор не забывает музыку своей родины и насыщает свои композиции мелодиями и ритмическими рисунками, знакомыми ему с детства. Я имею ввиду не только пьесу, которая даже называется Ten Large Serbians, но и целый ряд других треков. Особо надо сказать о композиции War Song, навеянной трагическими и кровавыми событиями, потрясавшими совсем недавно родину Марко. Но в целом Something Beautiful 1709-2110 - альбом из числа тех, которые слушать и легко, и интересно, и приятно. Истинно джазовый пульс ни на секунду не пропадает в музыке, созданной и исполненной настоящими мастерами во главе с ярким и самобытным ударником Марко Джорджевичем.

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May 27, 2013

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Examiner Review

By Oscar Brooks Do you remember what went on in Serbia and Yugoslavia a few years ago? The question could be asked, can anything good come out of Serbia? The answer to that question is definitely yes. Marko Djordjevic grew up in Serbia and is a formidable composer and astute band leader. His latest album is titled Something Beautiful (1709-2110) which includes swinging grooves and the freedom of improvisation. The album is filled with fine bass, drum and piano playing.

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May 07, 2013

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Midwest Records Review

MARKO DJORDJEVIC & SVETI/Something Beautiful: The Serbian drummer knows his way around being a leader in American contemporary jazz and serves up the left leaning, lightly progressive jazz that rides nicely out of the mainstream but never gets precious for the sake of precious. A solid swinger that kind of gleefully colors outside the lines, the classic left leaning Bluenote/Verve seeds are scattered generously around these proceedings. Heady, high octane and never riding in cruise control, this is a fine ear opener by a drummer that’s going to be setting new standards in due course. Hot stuff. CHRIS SPECTOR, Editor and Publisher

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May 05, 2013

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OS Place Jazz Review

Marko Djordjevic - Something Beautiful O's Notes: Serbian drummer and composer Marko Djordjevic teams up with Bobby Avey (p) and bassist Desmond White. Eli Degibri and Tivon Pennicott each add tenor sax on three selections. This is a formidable team worth tuning in for a spell. Djordjevic won't be the best kept secret for long. Something Beautiful brings us a taste of European jazz that is crossing new boundaries.

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Wesley Xavier Yurovchak

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Marko Djordjevic

Drummer, Composer, Educator